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, is the economy. high unemployment, growing disparity in wealth and income in this country. >> vermont senator bernie sanders, great to have you on this morning. thanks for your time. >> thank you. >> absolutely. >>> after the president's speech on the economy this morning, he's going t stop by this afternoon's white house youth summit. the goal is to engage the so-called young invincibles, ages 18 to 35, that the white house is banking on to make obama care a success. joining me is dr. coreyhebert and elizabeth plank, executive social editor at policy mike. it's great to have you both here. elizabeth, in just a few hours policy mike is launching this week-long competition at today's youth summit. tell us about the competition and how you're hoping to engage the conversation about insurance. >> sure. we're really excited to be launching this competition today at the white house. we're going to be inviting millennials from across the country to give their ideas, their proposals and project ideas about how we can make health care work better for our generation. we think that -- we're really exci
. making sense of the new jobs numbers. has the economy turned the corner when it comes to the economy. >>> we'll hear from president bill clinton. >>> motor city master pieces. the latest on possibly selling artwork opened by detroit. could it pull the city it of bankruptcy, and should it? >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "weekends with alex wit witt". president obama surging congress to extend benefits for 1.3 million workers. they are set to expire just three days after christmas. >> if congress refuses to act it won't just hurt families already struggling. it will actually harm our economy. unemployment insurance is one of the most effective ways there is to boost our economy. when people have money to spend on basic necessities, that means more customers for our businesses and ultimately more jobs. >> the republicans are focusing on obama care. >> families who work hard and play by the rules deserve some basic choices, fairness and relief. that's why the house has passed legislation to delay the individual mandate for all americans and let you keep the plan you like. these p
that these sanctions have absolutely crippled that economy. and so, what we would risk doing here in implementing a new round of sanctions is not just screwing up the negotiation, but sending a message to the iranian people, who are frankly way more pro-american than people might think -- >> right. >> -- that we aren't really serious about ultimately doing the deal they want. the hard-liners are isolated right now in iran, and we are, frankly, going to empower them if we show up at the table in the middle of these short-term negotiations with a new round of sanctions that even though they may take place in the future. this is about building confidence with the negotiators on the iranian side but also the iranian people. >> there's a political dimension to this. one of the polls we have, which is from reuters ipsos, on support for this deal show 2-1 support for it, which i was heartened to see. that doesn't necessarily reflect what i saw necessarily in the pundit class. but there's another moral dimension to this. i've heard a lot of people, along with some of your colleagues and commentators, we've got
:30 eastern time. a dow jones survey finds that the economy probably added 180,000 jobs last month. the unemployment rate is seen slipping 7.2%. we'll talk more about market expectations in just a few minutes, but we begin this morning with our top story. nelson mandela spent 27 years in prison, led his country to democracy and became its first black president. he died at home yesterday at the age of 95. chris takes a look at mandela's life and legacy. >> history books will remember nelson mandela as one of the world' most prominent crusaders for black rights, the son of an african tribal chief, nelson mandela gave up a comfortable life and his hereditary lights to be a tribal leader to become a political activist in the fight against apartheid. the system of white rule over the majority black population. >> to feel that it is for us to continue talking nonviolence and peace. >> he was jailed for organizing demonstrations as well as treason and sabotage. he spent 27 years behind bars, but his jailing fueled the fires of freedom. his plight became an international symbol of oppressi
louisiana, and whose in policies ignore everything we've learned. is have been a good healthy economy. that's the sad fact. first of all, there was no new flawed planted in the ground. he's been talking since the moment -- actually since he ran for president. to balance the budgets in a response way, reduce the deficit. those are precisely the things that he accomplished, so i'm pleased to know you agree. >> the difference quite simply is after five years, he still has not learned how to reach across the aisle. he was willing to sit down -- >> i've said this before, and i guess this is a tribute to you. you were a different kind of speaker. you were able to bring your caucus along, and get things done. >>> congressman, i'm sure you have a lot to respond to. >> yes, i do. very specific question. u ubs. >> do you great deal that inequality is a problem? >> yes, it's getting worse. you would think they weren't in power. the fact is the democrats have the house and senate. they did a $787 billion stimulus plan, the cash for clunkers, all these things that didn't grow the economy. they exacerbat
of what is expected to be a weaker payroll number in the u.s. economy. >>> germany's central bank raises its 2014 growth target for europe's largest economy as evidence shows demand from within the eurozone is finally picking up. >>> deutsche bank is to close its commodity business mainly in london and new york. display you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >> a former south african president nelson mandela passed away last night at the age of 95. world leaders have been sending message messages of mourning for the leader. >> he is now resting. he is now at peace. our nation has lost its greatest son our people have lost a father. >> for now, let us pause and give thanks to the fact that nelson mandela lived, a man who took history in his hands and bent the arc of the moral universe towards justice. >> nelson mandela was not just a hero of our time, but a hero of all time. the first president of a free south africa, a man who suffered so much for freedom and justice, and a man who through his dignity and through his triumph inspired milli
of today's opinion pages of "the wall street journal:." again, your thoughts on the economy, especially in light of these new numbers, with the federal unemployment rate at seven percent. in.ere is how you can call we divided the lines differently. if you are under 30 -- it is discussions about the economy that takeover the papers today, especially in light of these new numbers. here is the editorial page of "the new york times." they have a different take -- we start this morning in jacksonville florida. angel is up. good morning, what do you think about the economy in light of these current numbers? good morning. first of all, thank you so much for taking my call. go ahead, you're on. caller: there is still a selection process that is very difficult for many people. thethe reason is simple, young people are being selected -- the selection very picky.ery, degrees and i can't find a job in jacksonville, florida. some cities are picking up quickly, some aren't. keep are you going to looking for work or have you given up? caller: i will keep looking. fairs, i apply for work every day. i s
emergency jobless benefits. this, after friday's strong jobs report showing the economy added 203,000 jobs last month, sending the unemployment rate down to a five-year low of 7%. rick tyler, senior vice president of the strategy group and former spokesman for former house speaker newt gingrich. ellen ratner, talk radio news service bureau chief and fox news contributor. here now to talk about this. good to see both of you. >> thank you. >> good to be here. >> of course, more people working is always good news. do you think we need more placement, though, in jobs that are paying more than minimal wage or are more stable than part-time jobs? if so, how do we get there? >> we certainly do. part of the way we can get there is by developing more infrastructure projects because our infrastructure is crumbling in some places. certainly know the bridges and roads are doing it. jim pinkerton talks about this project he's got going. there are ways we can get these higher-paying jobs. every time there are people who make more money, they put more money into the economy. so that also stimulates the e
? >> describe the state of how you see the south african economy and the relationship between the united states and this current south african government. >> it's a dynamic moment in the relationship, chuck. you know that the fastest growing economies on the globe are in africa. south africa is the economy that has been stagnant over the course of the last few years following the recession that all of us are struggling to recover from. i will tell you that over 600 american countries on the ground here in south africa are bullish and optimistic about the future here spent a lot of time talking to both investors and young people who were entering the job market here and they are optimistic about the opportunities, but they know there real challenges particularly around education to make certain there is a sustainable economy and the shared prosperity this this country. >> one of the things i want to do with you, you were talking with andrea off camera and i am glad you brought up the cold war point. history and a reminder of what that -- how frankly we were behind the times as a government when
. it will be good for our economy. it will be good for our families. [ applause ] number four, as i alluded to earlier, we still need targeted programs for the communities and workers that have been hit hardest by economic change in the great recession. these communities are no longer limited to the inner city. they're found in neighborhoods hammered by the housing crisis, manufacturing towns hit hard by years of plants packing up, land-locked rural areas where young folks oftentimes feel like they've got to leave just to find a job. they're communities that just aren't generating enough jobs anymore. so we put forward new plans to help these communities and their residents because we've watched cities like pittsburgh or my hometown of chicago revamp themselves. if we give more cities the tools to do it, not handouts but a hand up, cities like detroit can do it too. so in a few weeks, we'll announce the first of these promise zones, urban and rural communities where we'll support local efforts focused on a national goal. that is, a child's course in life should not be determined by the zip
the booming american economy. i'll ask the man who presided over great growth and some critics charge also helped create many bubbles. former fed chair, alan greenspan. >>> and as we approach the first anniversary of the new town massacre, what can the u.s. learn from other nations about gun policy. i'll take you to japan for a fascinating look at a nation that loves violent video games but has a gun death rate that is very different from america's. it's a preview of a gps special airing tonight at 7:00 p.m. eastern. >>> but first, here's my take. when nelson mandela was released from prison in 1990, i remember being struck by how old-fashioned he seemed. he spoke with the language cadence and manners from the 1930s, 40s and 1950s. he reminded me of the great national leaders of the post colonial world who led their countries to freedom. he had the same way of speaking and dressing, the same dignity and bearing, the same sense of history. and mandela was a throw back to an early time. who changed the course of history. 27 years in prison had kept intact his manners, but also his morals. hi
close friday, they ended what was a pretty big week for the u.s. economy. stocks high, unemployment low, and the economy growing better than anyone expected. zane asher is in new york with what it means and how it all happened. >> reporter: fredricka, it was a big week for the economy. car sales rose, new-home sales roared and the unemployment rate dropped to 7%, the lowest since 2008. and it fell for positive reasons, because people are finding work. earlier this year, the unemployment rate declined because a lot of people got discouraged, gave up looking for work and weren't counted, but the opposite seems to be happening. it's added more jobs since 2005 and the gains are not in low-wage sectors. a lot of hiring in health care, transportation, professional services like accountants and travel agents. wages are also up and americans are working more hours. the list goes on. the report pushed the dow up nearly 200 points friday. wall street is thinking the federal reserve will reduce the stimulus program soon. certainly a sign the economy is ready to stand on its own two feet. but remem
's imagine ten million people lose their jobs, we expect to fall off in spending. but the economy is certainly better today than it was in 2009, so -- >> i want to put dollars and cents to this. this is the difference in the cbo projected savings. they're projects $222 billion in a year from medicare and medicaid from this slowing of health care costs. the sequester is $87.9, and the cuts to food stamps is $23.8 billion. >>> i have been on twitter all day about this, they can't find a single positive thing to say about the law. literally it could bring people's health care costs down to zero, they could cure cancer, and conservatives would be shouting from the rooftops that it's a disaster. i think this california thing is hysterical. in part because it's the sort of natural conclusion of the republican panic about this. they vote in mass against the law even though it originated in republican ideas. they vote to try to repeal it unsuccessfully. the website they think will sink it, and then they just throw toilet paper at it. >> and in the absence of a website that wasn't malfunct
to that breaking news on the economy, americans are getting back to work, 203,000 jobs were added to payrolls in november, and the unemployment rate ticked two notches lower to 7%. that's the lowest unemployment rate in five years. our chief business correspondent christine romans is here to break down the numbers. better than expected, so should we feel absolutely completely good about this? >> i saw some broad-based strength in these numbers from warehousing to retail to transportation to construction so there's broad based health care as well, that's important here. carol, the trend, i always talk about the trend how important that is. you look at the last four months on average, 200,000 plus jobs over the last four months and carol we are on track this year for the most jobs created since 2005. we're on track for more than 2 million jobs created and that is a marked improvement from what we've seen in recent memory, so this is good news, a 7% unemployment rate is still good news. you'll hear people talk about their concerns about this underemployment rate, 13.2%, people who are unemployed
struggling, it will actually harm our economy. unemployment insurance is one of the most effective ways there is to boost our economy. when people have money to spend on basic necessities, that means more customers for our businesses and ultimately more jobs. >> the republicans meantime remain focused on obama care. north carolina congress woman renee elmhurst delivered the gop's response earlier today. >> families who work hard and by play the rules deserve some basic choices, fairness and relief. that's why the house has passed legislation to delay the individual mandate for all americans and let you keep the plan you like. these proposals are among the dozens of house passed jobs bills awaiting action in the democratic-run senate. >> meanwhile, good news on the latest jobs report to share. 203,000 of them created in november, just 1,000 shy of the number of jobs created in october. unemployment fell by.3 down to 7%, the lowest in five years. kristen welker is at the white house for us. kristin, i'm curious how the white house is interpreting these numbers. all good? >> well, look, th
warren, thank you. we're going to turn to the economy. wall street is reacting positively despite today's better than expected jobs report. i say despite because series of positive results could signal it's time to turn the policies. a net gain of 203,000 jobs. the unemployment rate slid to five-year low of 7%. over the past four months, the economy gained an average of more than 200,000 jobs each month. that's up sharply from the previous four months. okay, if it's jobs friday, it times for our dynamic economic duo, jared bernstein and peter marchi, even you have to feel good about this jobs report. >> i think this is a good jobs report given what we've been through. >> easy, jerry. >> i would like to have more jobs and be around 300,000, 400,000 but i think next year will be even better. so much so i think it is time to start to withdraw the stimulus and start focusing on budgetary priorities in terms of what do we really want to do. what do we really need and worry less about stimulus but more about the fundamentals. we need to rebuild bridges. let's not do that because it's stimulus
from an economy adding jobs. it's at a five-year low of 7%. 203,000 jobs were created in november. and more of them are in higher-paying sectors. >> we saw, you know, the predictable retail jobs and leisure and hospitality, bars and restaurants, because of the holidays, but we saw things like manufacturing, saw things like business, professional services, again tend to pay a little bit more money. so these were broadbased job gains. >> reporter: the november jobs report was better than expected. for a third year in a row, more than 2 million jobs have been created. still, that's not enough to make up for the 9 million jobs lost between 2008 and 2009. >> did you think it would be difficult to find a job? >> to be honest, no. i thought i would be handed a job. i thought people would be asking me to have a job. >> reporter: in the last year, the unemployment dropped a full percentage point, but 11 million people are searching for jobs and the long-term unemployed are struggling the most. in some places, some people are fighting for jobs. walmart in district of columbia. 600 job openi
, they won't need social services, and the economy, the system will be paying less into social services as a whole. so 50 cents for a burger is really not that big of a deal. >> all right. nbc's katy tur, thank you for that report. i want to now bring in an associate professor of economics at umass. he also penned "the new york times" op-ed "the minimum we can do." he says, while we can set a wage floor using policy, should we, or leave it to the market. thanks so much for joining us. >> thanks for having me. >> so i wanted to start, one of the things i thought was interesting in your op-ed is you talk about the fact we used to have a variety of mechanisms for setting the wage. it wasn't just up to employers. some of those mechanisms have gone away over time. explain that. >> yeah, for most of the post-world war ii era, wages in the u.s. were set using a combination of things like the minimum wage as well as collective bargaining, unions, who actually used to help set wages together with employers. that is not the case today. unions and the private sector have virtually disappeared in m
industry is a $200 billion industry and one of the most profitable industries in our economy today. mcdonald's, for example, which pays its workers a median wage of less than $9 an hour posted $5.5 billion in profits last year and compensated its ceo almost $14 million. so clearly, the money is there in the corporation and the question is how do we get that to trickle down to workers above poverty wages. >> it makes sense and on the other end, the way the business models is set up, that's not the way the world is working right now and they've talked about this debate. you heard katy say it, and economists that i've seen crunch the numbers have said the cost of a burger and fries would go up 10% to 20%. the franchise association says 25% to 50% and that ultimately, though, their big argument says this will lead to the loss of entry-level jobs. does it have to? >> it doesn't have to, and we know that when you give workers a wage and especially low-wage workers. wage increase and they spend that money and put it right back into the economy. those are the workers that eat at the establishm
sales promotions. christine romans is here with the good news. >> automakers saw the economy is getting better and they think it will keep getting better next year and that is great for auto sales. when you look at car sales, it really gives you a clue into the minds of the consumer. you don't just spend $38,000 on something casually. you need access to credit, confidence about your job, a ro reason to do it. very good numbers for november. 14% year over year increase for gm, that's great. ford, up 7%. chrysler, up 16%. and it wasn't just the incentives. there were good incentives. about $2500 on average was the incentive to get out there and buy a car. big advertising for black friday. a lot of people went to the showrooms, that helped. but this is really a recovering economy story. and pent up demand story. and you're hearing it from the automakers who are looking at the a good 2014, as well. their stocks reflecting it, too. >> absolutely. so the auto bailout was a good idea? we all remember back in 2008 when mitt romney said let detroit go bankrupt and there was a big partisan fight.
. try campbell's homestyle soup. >>> the latest jobs report shows good signs for the economy. the unemployment rate dropped to 7% in november while 203,000 jobs were created. down from october's unemployment rate of 7.3%. these numbers come as many job seekers are preparing to take the traditional pause in their hubt for work in time for the holidays. but that may be a bad idea. john challenger is the ceo of challenger, gray and christmas. zachary karabell is a cnbc contributor. he's a writer as well. he's written a book as well. john, let me start with you. many folks put off their job search during the holidays thinking that companies don't hire during this time period. why is that not the right thing to do? >> first of all, the data doesn't support it. last november, over 4.66 million people found jobs in november, just slightly down in december. so it is a time when employers especially in this kind of 24/7/365 business environment we're in, they're always hiring. they always have issues. so the last thing you want to do is put your search on hold. the very fact that a lo
what does that say about our economy? >> well, first of all, the data we get on -- from the retailers at this time of year is almost always contradictory and confusing. they are not always completely forthcoming because they don't want to discourage people from shopping. i think the most interesting thing we saw over the weekend, besides the fact that a number of retailers decided to be open on thanksgiving day, was that 40% of the sales were on-line. in a sense, cyber monday is an accra nism. cyber monday dates from the day when people had slow internet at home and came to work on monday after thanksgiving and ordered. now so many have broadband people are shopping on-line all the time and the retailers are scrambling to catch up with consumers. >> i shop on-line too in light of the incidents you see every black friday, always seems to be a fight somewhere and that can't help retailers, right? >> right. well, of course not. but i think people like going to the stores. we at the "wall street journal" and others did stories following teenagers around the mall and that's social. you can
's the nature of democracy. it's a work in progress. and south africa, we see it as the largest economy, second largest economy on the continent. but it's a young democracy. it's taking those baby steps. it'll only be 20 years in 2014 that it has been a democracy. now, that doesn't mean that you forgive some of the missteps, but you go in there and work on them and find people who can hold people accountable. and i think that's where it's important for that country as well as in the countries relating to mandela to relate to his country and to help them realize the life of mandela. now it's up to those who are celebrating him today to tomorrow realize that dream, help realize that dream. >> great leadership is all about casting the vision. calling people to rise up to be better than they know how to be. certainly as you point out, that road map, the blueprint, it's there. charlayne hunter-gault, reverend al sharpton, great to see you. among those reacting to mandela's death is muhammad ali. he said he was a spirit born free destined to soar above the rainbows. today his spirit is soaring throug
know the economy is essential, and it's good he was meeting with secretary geithner, but here on his signature issue not to take charge. and i have no doubt the white house is right, that secretary sebelius was in several group meetings with the president about health care, but the whole point is, there was nobody in charge in the administration. the president was turning to and saying i look to you for overall responsibility, and in this case it should have been the secretary of health and human services. she does run the department that oversees this. and the fact that he was not meeting with her one-on-one, i think, frankly, is not so much an indictment of her but of the white house operation. >> which is fascinating because we saw her testify very publicly, she took full responsibility for what had happened, but at the same time if this was so important to the president, you would think that there was a lot more one-on-one interaction especially on something that's so critical to him and his policy. professor, the president went on msnbc this week, he was asked about his manageme
at all. >> the biggest issue that i see out in the horizon is how do we make sure an economy works for everybody? >> the greatest single challenge facing our globalized world is to combat the eradicate its disparities. >> how do we do those things that e deuce the equality in our society and broaden equality? >> he was a communist, this man. he was a communist. >> i would make the argument that we have a great injustice right now in the country with an ever-increasing size of government that's taking over and controlling people's lives and obama care is front and center of that. >> yes! he just compared fighting the health care law to fighting aparthe apartheid. >>> a freedom fighter, a radical, a disrupter of the highest order. his birth name means pulling branches of a tree and pull he did. president mandela not only freed a nation, he reminded the world of our common humanity. he put the good of the south african people, all south africans, above all else. over the course of his 27 years in prison, mandela wisely used his time to prepare, to plan and to embrace both forgiveness
, but the entire financial underpinnings of growth in the innovation economy is decades old. we realize that. we have set out to say what would venture investing look like if they were invented in 2013 if it was approached from a user experience point of view? what do people really want? how do we make there be less friction in this experience? >> i have started a couple of companies in 30 years. we do not know what raising capital was all about. we had no idea that they're supposed to be a process. it is only the last couple of years that i've learned that there was a process you are supposed to follow. i just went out and keep bugging people until they give you as much dollars as you needed. you have commoditized it for small companies. we get on average a couple of hundred e-mails a year that say hey, i have got a great idea. how do i get started? >> that touches on one of the key problems we saw that exist today. if you are out there raising capital, what are you not doing? you're not talking to your users or your customers. we are not building your product or services. fundraising becomes a
suppose? >> a farer economy. an economy that really meets our expectations of what the american dream should be. we've seen four decades of wage stagnation and it's because of unfair actionation, a tax on union and collective bargaining, unfair trade policies. and the net result has been so many hard working people cannot put food on the table based on what they're being paid. we see exorbitant types of bonuses where other people are getting $7.25. it's not fair. the united states is the richest country in the world. >> the government seems helpless to do anything about the wage gap in this country. there's a bill that would raise the minimum wage to 10 bucks an hour. you know that's a nonstarter. you guys are working a couple more days this year and then deal with the budget next year. there's not any time to push for a minimum wage bill. why not be honest about it and tell people now? >> we believe because where there's a will, there's a way. people need better pay. it's not for me to say because the odd are tough that we're not going to fight for it, we're going to fight for it any
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you hrks this is a drain on our economy. >> if they thought they could control that much of the economy and that much of the policy board, i would see them aiming at that. i think they short term hope that happens. but with 1.5 million people being told they qualify for medicaid, with thousands signing up. with more people signing up for obama care in the last two days than the first whole month of the program, i think the train is out of the station, i think it will be politically influx -- >> rachel, the debate has just changed. you know, when the conversation was only about the inability to get on line, and there was confusion out there, 85% of americans don't need to be concerned with going on line. i will say you have insurance through your employer, nothing is going to change for you. so i think the confusion has really been a detriment. i am from pennsylvania, we don't have our exchange, i probably would have more than two dozen choices. if our governor had cooperated, i think in addition to aetna and in addition to blue cross i would be looking for more solutions.
on cnn. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> memorials are growing and people in south africa are celebrating the life of nelson mandela, the civil rights icon died thursday at the age of 95. cnn's robin kurnow is live outside his home in johannesburg where it really is a place of holding vigil, at the same time celebrating his life. >> reporter: absolutely. it's like a pilgrimage here. south africans doing what they always do, they sing in times of happiness and in times of hardship. and this noise, this celebration, this la meant you hear behind me has been going on literally since thursday night. people singing over and over again, nelson mandela, nelson mandela, there's no one like you. now, many of these south africans behind me felt like they had a personal closeness with nelson mandela. they owe so much to him. and he had that way with people. his family saying today that he had time for everyone, kings and queens, rich or poor, great or small. and, in fact, one of those people was bill clinto
economy, helping you readjust along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your investments as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you fine-tune your personal economy. start today with a free one-on-one review of your retirement plan. . >>> nelson mandela's compassion, hum humanity, humility touches millions all over the world. peter turnley was there the day mandela was released from prison more than 20 years ago. he described the moments that followed in his own words. >> nelson mandela's example, his courage, his determination, his dignity, his forward thinking of conciliation, of forgiveness and of love for all is something that has touched so many people and it has been something that has brought people towards him and brought people together. on the morning of february 11th, 1990 i was with a group of photographers. we had gotten to the prison very early that morning. at one point in the early afternoon, i will never forget suddenly about five helicopters began to descend right over the back of this
challenge to the possibility that white africanas can walk aawith an economy and privileges they had before it all begins to unravel. >> those young people are not only those people -- the young people living in south africa who are bearing the brunt of this violent regime and are willing to go to even more extreme lengths to make sure that apartheid crumbled but also the solidarity, then, with the international group of young people who make apartheid their fundamental -- >> and that was such a key point that all over the world -- and we talk about immigration and talk about the fast food movement. we have to look right now at the movement that ultimately took down apartheid. it was especially young people on college campuses, workers, not on college campuses, the polaroid worker who is said we're not going to be part of the company that provides the photos for the passbooks in south africa. it was this economic threat from the more radical young people and from youk people all over the world -- i mean, the campus movement in the united states was immense, very threatening to establishment
of our time making sure our economy works for every working american. the opportunity gap in america is now as much about class as it is race. that gap is growing. so if we're going to take on growing inequality and improve upper mobility for all people, we've got to move beyond the false notion this is an issue exclusively of minority concern. >> good morning major garrett at white house. >> reporter: good morning charlie, norah, viewers out west. he gave the speech of what he believes an obsession republicans have to prosperity. the white house disagrees on this issue coming front and center in the next couple of weeks. congressional negotiator democrats and republicans on capitol hill are trying to figure out a way to avoid the second round of across the board spending cuts otherwise known as sequestration. those cuts would harm the push for better economic growth and wage equality. another push from the president, renewed push for higher minimum wage. currently $7.25 an hour. the white house backs the democratic proposal to raise to $10.10 an hour. these are
to establish with every single asian economy except china. >> tremendously important to japan and the united states. >> and japan's not necessarily been on board with this as much as all the other southeastern asian countries are. right. that's true. so even though the concentration has been on the senekaku island and so forth, the tpp really is the ball game as far as the continuity of the relationship and quite apart from the fact that japan has interests certainly in south korea and vice versa where the vice president is headed. >> it's a tricky relationship. the japanese and south korea aren't exactly -- they're allies but scent cal of each other. >> not only that, but the south koreans feel they provided slave labor for the japanese, that they haven't been fully compensated. so they still want payment. the japanese settled that a long time ago. so the south korean prime minister in saying that, as a matter of fact, our problem with the japanese is much greater than that with china, that's any first trip should be to china, not to japan. >> that was a little bit of a snub as far as the j
. >> the president's health care law continues to wreak havoc on american families, small businesses and our economy. and it's not just a broken website. this bill is fundamentally flawed. >> all right. but with the website fixed and accessible to millions of americans, what will republicans have to specifically to complain about now? joining me is democratic congressman john yarmuth from kentucky. kentucky considered a poster state for how obama care can work. sir, it's good to have you here. you're from a red state where the democratic governor there made it his mission to get as many residents signed up under the health care law as possible. as a result, we've got more than 60,000 in your home state signing up for coverage as of this week. and in a state where 640,000 are lacking proper insurance. how do you think that the white house's pr push nationally to replicate what we're seeing in kentucky? >> well, i think what is ultimately going to sell the affordable care act is neighbor telling 98 ponen9nene bore, rel telling relative about the positive experiences they have had. in kentucky, that's
horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. so you can see like right here i can just... you know, check my policy here, add a car, ah speak to customer service, check on a claim...you know, h, wi tap of my geico app. oh, that's so cool. well, i would disagree with you but, ah, that would make me a liar. no dude, you're on the jumbotron! whoa. ah...yeah, pretty much walked into that one. geico anywhere anytime. just a tap away on the geico app. >>> welcome back. president obama gave chris matthews an extended interview on msnbc on thursday. the appearance raised a few eyebrow s and riled up some mea types. >> the american people are good and they are decent. and yes we get very divided partly because our politics and our media specifically tries to divide them. and splint ter them. >> ah, yes, president obama as media critic. i personally love when any president jabs the press because it gets us talking about fairness, both the medias and the administrations. eric dagen is the critic for the npr. jane, you used
about that today. >> through the government shut down, the economy lot of $24 billion. unnecessary, shameful action. the cost of providing unemployment compensation over the next year, $24 billion. >> i wonder if on the unemployment insurance, you are trying to convince somebody to purchase they may not need or want. when it comes to unemployment insurance, everyone knows you can be unemployed. what is the tactical reason that can be derived to say we will save this tiny amount of money. >> i don't know what the advantage is here. people again, folks living paycheck to paycheck and unemployment benefits is direct money into the hands of people who need it and into the communities. they have money for food and shelter and clothing. whatever it is they need. republicans who always express all this care and concern about the american worker and they are speaking for the american people, they go mute when it comes time to help them. >> i wonder if the president's best ally, the wingman if it were will be the hope. the president is sort of making that shared community argument on everyt
industry in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 70% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. combinations of your favorite seafood from lobster to crab, shrimp and mussels in a savory broth. try one today, and sea food differently. now, try seven lunch choices at $7.99. sandwiches, salads and more. the day building a play set begins with a surprise twinge of back pain... and a choice. take up to 4 advil in a day or 2 aleve for all day relief. [ male announcer ] that's handy. ♪ >>> debunktion junction, what's my function? true or false? obama care does not, i repeat, does not cover babies? exhibit a, when this man tried to get insurance for his family, he was told he could buy a plan for his wife and himself and three young children, but his youngest child was out in the cold. obama care does not cover babies. th
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industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 70% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. and you work hard to get to the next level. it feels good when you reach point b, but you're not done. for you, "b" is not the end. capella university will take you further, because our competency-based curriculum gives you skills you can apply immediately, to move your career forward. to your point "c." capella university. start your journey at capella.edu. store and essentially they just get sold something. we provide the exact individualization that your body needs. it's the ultimate sale on the bed clinically proven to improve sleep quality. the sleep number bed. once you experience it, there's no going back. for two days only, queen mattresses start at just $599.99. and save 50% on limited edition innovation or memory
to listen to the american people and to focus on their concerns. now, whether it's the economy, whether it's jobs, whether it's protecting the american people from obama care, we've done our work. when you look at the number of bills passed by the house and the paltry number of bills passed by the senate, you can see where the problem is. >> so far if you can believe it, only 55 bills have been signed into law this year. that makes this the least productive congress ever. >>> we talked about this just a few minutes ago, amazon with the world on the edge of its seat. they have this tantalizing glimpse into the future of faster delivery using drones. it turns ot drones are already in widespread use. check it out, real estate agents use them to photograph homes for prospective buyers. farmers used them to spray. even hollywood uses them on productions. so if amazon has its way, will drones be dropping that new pair of shoes or a book at your doorstep? let me bring in matthew yglesias, nick wingfield is a "new york times" technology reporter. good to see you, guys, good morning. >> good mornin
price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 70% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> your rights as a frequent flyer are on the line right now before the united states supreme court. this case is generating lots of buzz. the justices heard arguments today pitting the airline against a rabbi whose frequent flyer privileges were yanked because he was complaining too much. >> almost always complaints get resolved without the lawyers getting involved. it's been said that rabbi benjamin glinsburg spends more time in the air than on the ground. he was dumped from his frequent flyer program, why? because he complained too much. they said he was abusing the program to get extra perks. he says his complaints were all on the up and up. >> it wasn't an issue where the peanuts were too salty or that they served pepsi instead of coke products. they
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